Heartbleed Bug Not a Threat to Gulf Winds Members: On an ongoing basis, Gulf Winds evaluates its website and online systems for security threats and potential vulnerabilities. Gulf Winds’ systems are not susceptible to the recent “Heartbleed Bug” and no systems have been compromised. Members can be assured that their accounts remain safe and secure.

Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union

Blog Topics

 

Follow via RSS.

Recent Posts

Top Financial Myths Not to Believe

Should You Rent Out Your Home Instead of Selling?

Is Your Checking Account Giving Back to You This Season?

How to Prioritize Your Holiday Shopping Without Breaking the Budget

How to Buy a Home With Zero Down

Is a VA Loan Right For You?

How to Use a Home Equity Line of Credit the Right Way

4 Types of Mortgages That Require Little or No Money Down

What You Need to Know to Protect Yourself, and Your Finances, From Identity Theft

Prepare for Fraud Prevention This Holiday Season and Protect Your Online Banking

Contact Us

Close

Phone Banking and General Inquiries:

Pensacola Area: 850.479.9601    Tallahassee Area: 850.562.6702

Toll Free: 800.650.6328

Email:

Lost or Stolen ATM or VISA Debit Card:

Pensacola Area: 850.479.9601    Tallahassee Area: 850.562.6702

Toll Free: 800.650.6328

After Hours, Weekends and Holidays: 800.472.3272

Lost or Stolen Credit Card:

Toll Free: 800.449.7728    More Contact Info

Keep up to date with our eNewsletter

Sign Up

Clearing Out Your Personal Finance Clutter: A Keep and Toss Checklist

Posted on Monday, Apr 8, 2013

One of the most tedious aspects of personal finance is keeping track of paperwork. By law, you're obligated to hold on to certain financial documents in case the IRS decides to audit your taxes, but once you know which documents are essential and which are just clutter, you'll find that your paperwork is manageable. Take a look at these two lists to know what you must keep and what you can toss.

What You Must Keep

• Bank statements should be kept for one year unless they're needed to support tax filings, in which case they must be kept for seven years.
• Home purchase and improvement records should be kept as long as you own the property.
• Insurance policies should be kept as long as the policies are in force.
• Investment certificates and annual investment statements should be kept until you sell the investments.
• Loan documents must be kept until you sell the item the loan covered.
• Real estate deeds must be kept for as long as you own the property.
• Social security statements only need to be kept until you receive the next statement (usually yearly).
• Tax records, including all back-up documentation, must be kept for seven years from the filing date.
• Vehicle titles should be kept until you sell or dispose of the vehicle.

What You Can Toss

• Grocery receipts
• Paycheck stubs. Some people keep their paycheck stubs until they receive their W-2 at the end of the year so they can add up their stubs and verify that their W-2 is correct.
• Canceled checks. The exception to this rule is if the canceled checks verify business expenses. If they do, hang on to them for three years.
• Utility bill stubs
• Credit card receipts. Reconcile your account each month and then toss your receipts.
• Old tax returns. If you're hanging on to tax returns from a decade ago, go ahead and purge your files. Keep only the last seven tax returns, and free up your file space by getting rid of the rest.

With your personal finance files updated, you'll feel much more clear-headed about your financial life. One thing to remember, though, is to shred your financial documents when you discard them. Bank statements, credit card statements, and tax returns all contain personal information that could be a gold mine to an identity thief. Shred anything that contains account numbers, your social security number, or other personal information.

Share your thoughts

Commenting is not available in this channel entry.